Checkpoint #1 [Films 100 - 91]



I’ve watched my first/ the last 10 films from the IMDb top 100 now, so it seems like a good place to stop, have a breather and generally reflect a little. If it hasn’t come across already, I’m seriously enjoying myself. I’ve watched some incredibly interesting films, 6 of which I’d never seen previously, or really heard of in all honesty. I’ve covered quite a few genres: silent, sci-fi, western, anime and a couple foreign language ones too. I know more about film history and the industry in general than I did a month ago, but I was starting from nothing. And to top it all off, I’ve cracked my fear of letting people read my writing (and from the looks of it, quite a few people have been reading – thanks!). All in all, I’m quite happy with my success so far.

            Now to attend to some points people have raised over the last month:
-       I won’t be rating the films, or rearranging them in my order of preference. I don’t see it as a particularly useful or accurate system for critiquing films. Sorry to disappoint.
-       I’m using the top 100 films from the IMDb’s top rated 250. 250 in one year just isn’t going to happen for me.
-       I’m using the list that I’ve posted on here. I’m aware it keeps changing, which is why I put it on here – so that you can refer to the same one as me. There are obvious logistical issues for working off an ever-shifting list.
-       My favourite film so far is a toss-up between Inglourious Basterds and Oldboy.
-       My least favourite is probably Indiana Jones.
           
            Now to the second purpose of this checkpoint: please comment below with anything you wish to share. Be critical – this is all practice for me and I value your input. Anything about content, writing style, the design of the blog, etc. is much appreciated.
            Finally, I hope you’re enjoying my blog. I am certainly enjoying writing it.

Comments

  1. To openly invite a maths student to critique your delightfully-unpretentious verbiage puts me into something of a win-win (bi-winning?) situation; should a linguistically-challenged arithmophile correct a literary virtuoso on the latter’s subject of expertise, derision ensues and pride is wounded, while the expectation on the former being able to actually complete a coherent sentence is delightfully low. As such an opportunity comes once every other blue moon, I thought I'd use my freedom of anality to its fullest extent and focus my criticism on just a single misdemeanour.

    Whilst perusing your Star Wars-related nostalgia, the grammatically-aesthetic nirvana I had been enjoying was torn asunder upon reaching the following:

    "I remember my brother and I rewinding the VHS..."

    In this instance, the subject of the main verb
    "remembering" is you, with the object of the reminiscence being you and your brother (as a singular entity). It is therefore necessary to transform the second occurrence of the pronoun "I" into its objective form "me":

    "I remember my brother me rewinding the VHS..."

    However, I assume of course that this was entirely deliberate and was indeed intended as an ironic gesture at the grammatical folly of the faux-intellectual masses. Well done.

    Upon re-reading the checkpoint's instructions above, my foolish assumption of a safeguard from retribution over any poorly-taken criticism, made during the initial cursory glance, seems to be entirely unfounded. Unfortunately, I feel that discarding my efforts would be too painful on my part, given the considerable time I have spent dotting my 'i's and crossing my 't's. I therefore look forward to seeing you on Saturday with an appreciative slap and a hug.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I clearly got excitable when crossing my 't's and crossed out an entire "and". The corrected fragment should read "I remember my brother AND me rewinding the VHS..."

      Delete
  2. ...Michal??

    You've got us all talking in my kitchen about this - linguistic nerds are easily excited! But, we've come to the decision that actually I was correct(!)
    It all comes down to cases. 'I' is nominative, the subject, the thing which is doing something in the sentence. I was remembering, but I was also rewinding the VHS. You can have two subjects.
    I feel like I should give you the win as you put your case forward so eloquently. (In fact, I felt rather threatened ;) )
    Looking forward to that slap!
    Cam x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I deeply appreciate the nobleness in your reversing this decision! x

      Delete
  3. Don't cross the Camilla, especially on grammar. I had the whole thing explained to me last week & I was in awe. Talk about accusative. Some of the lecture stuck (& Cam is right on this occasion), but when I forget the technical rules, I can always fall back on my rule of thumb. Would you say 'I rewound the VHS', or ''me rewound the VHS'? That simple 'proof' (to regurgitate the maths angle) works for me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Translating your argument to maths is like extracting the expression 2+1 from (2+1)mod2, which are clearly not equal. You cannot ignore the entire problem, as you end up creating solutions to problems that don't exist. I agree with the principle - as a standalone phrase, "I rewound the VHS" is correct. However, in this instance, the object of the verb is the person rewinding the VHS, whereas in the original phrase "I remember my brother and me rewinding the VHS", they are the subject - hence the extrapolation argument. As there is no comma after "I remember", which would make little sense as an unrelated clause anyway, the brother and me are the direct subjects of the verb 'remembering'. What they are doing while being remembered is irrelevant, as without the proper declension of pronouns in the first part of the sentence, the rest of the sentence makes no grammatical sense. I hereby submit to you that I am correct and Cam's initial argument is incorrect (as rare as that may be!).

      Delete
    2. And the mathematical key to read the above is to swap "subject" and "object" around!! ;)

      Delete
  4. I have really enjoyed the first ten reviews Cam & I look forward to witnessing your continuing on the journey. Don't forget, this is in your genes via your paternal great grandfathers.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I have enjoyed your reviews but in this piece of writing you have stated that silent and anime are genres which they are not.
    Chris

    ReplyDelete
  6. Oh really? Oops. What would we classify them as?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Styles I guess. silent and animation can contain all genres. weastern, science fiction, war, adventure, gangster etc.

      Delete
  7. Camilla, who are your paternal great-grandfathers?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My dad's grandfathers on both sides were cinema owners. My dad's mother got an article published about Mr Power the cinema owner, her father.

      Delete
  8. After further discussion with Michal this weekend we have come to the decision that actually I was incorrect. New subjects can only be introduced in new clauses. The sentence structure was generally weak anyway so apologies, readers.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular Posts